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Book Review: A Historical Analysis of the Creek Indian Hillabee Towns

Don East, A Historical Analysis of the Creek Indian Hillabee Towns

Don has written a book about his recollection of the Creek Indians of East Central Alabama. He was born and raised in the area, being of Creek Indian Ancestry and spending all of his youth and young adult years there, he has a deep personal history, that won’t ever reach the best seller list. But the monetary aspect was not the goal of the book; the goal was to get the history out before I croak, since a lot of it was stored in my head.

Don is 1/8th Creek Indian born and raised in the Hillabee area of east central Alabama. A veteran of 36 years as a Naval Flight Officer retiring as a Captain in 1992.

Don East is a member of the NCVA and the Smoky Mountain Chapter. He began his career as a CT T-Brancher. He was a First Class Petty Officer when he received his commission in Pensacola as a Naval Flight Officer.

A Historical Analysis of the Creek Indian Hillabee Towns

The story of the Hillabees has been both the Cinderella and the Rodney Dangerfield of Creek Indian history. Until now, it has been neglected and has garnered little respect. But author Don C. East changes that in this extensive historical look at the rise and fall of the Hillabee faction of the Creek Indian tribe and its existence in Clay County, Alabama. Based on research, personal experience, and supplemented with maps and illustrations, A Historical Analysis of the Creek Indian Hillabee Towns uncovers a wealth of new information on these towns, their residents, the Creeks in general, and other Indian and white characters of the period. East’s working knowledge of the Creek language produces new information on the meanings of many Creek Indian names and words associated with the Hillabees. Born and raised in the area, being of Creek Indian ancestry, and spending all of his youth and young adult years there, he has a deep personal understanding of the Hillabee Creek Indians and Clay County. The Creek Hillabees may have had a history of less than 300 years, but they secured an important and prominent place in Creek and local pioneer white history during that time frame. You may also request an autographed copy form Don at 981 Country Road 2811, Lineville AL 36266. Softback $27.00 or hardback $32.00 includes shipping and handling.

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Richard Thornton is a professional architect, city planner, author and museum exhibit designer-builder. He is today considered one of the nation’s leading experts on the Southeastern Indians. However, that was not always the case. While at Georgia Tech Richard was the first winner of the Barrett Fellowship, which enabled him to study Mesoamerican architecture and culture in Mexico under the auspices of the Institutio Nacional de Antropoligia e Historia. Dr. Roman Piňa-Chan, the famous archaeologist and director of the Museo Nacional de Antropologia, was his fellowship coordinator. For decades afterward, he lectured at universities and professional societies around the Southeast on Mesoamerican architecture, while knowing very little about his own Creek heritage. Then he was hired to carry out projects for the Muscogee-Creek Nation in Oklahoma. The rest is history.Richard is the Tribal Historic Preservation Officer for the KVWETV (Coweta) Creek Tribe and a member of the Perdido Bay Creek Tribe. In 2009 he was the architect for Oklahoma’s Trail of Tears Memorial at Council Oak Park in Tulsa. He is the president of the Apalache Foundation, which is sponsoring research into the advanced indigenous societies of the Lower Southeast.

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