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Guess where this Cherokee Band is performing

Guess where this Cherokee Band is performing

Think that this photo was made on the Strip in Cherokee, NC?

You’re wrong!

MysteryNativesRevealed

Dennis Partridge, a member of the People of One Fire, and a director of the Apalache Foundation, took this photograph in the Czech Republic.   He says that there are several “Native American” bands are touring Europe these days, who are really Armenians.  They dress as Lakota Sioux, but call themselves Cherokees.

Mystery2Most Europeans and Americans are fooled because they are accustomed to seeing Jewish, Italian and Middle Eastern actors portray Native American men.  Very often the actresses portraying Native American women did have some Native or Oriental ancestry, mixed with Irish or French heritage.

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Richard Thornton is a professional architect, city planner, author and museum exhibit designer-builder. He is today considered one of the nation’s leading experts on the Southeastern Indians. However, that was not always the case. While at Georgia Tech Richard was the first winner of the Barrett Fellowship, which enabled him to study Mesoamerican architecture and culture in Mexico under the auspices of the Institutio Nacional de Antropoligia e Historia. Dr. Roman Piňa-Chan, the famous archaeologist and director of the Museo Nacional de Antropologia, was his fellowship coordinator. For decades afterward, he lectured at universities and professional societies around the Southeast on Mesoamerican architecture, while knowing very little about his own Creek heritage. Then he was hired to carry out projects for the Muscogee-Creek Nation in Oklahoma. The rest is history.Richard is the Tribal Historic Preservation Officer for the KVWETV (Coweta) Creek Tribe and a member of the Perdido Bay Creek Tribe. In 2009 he was the architect for Oklahoma’s Trail of Tears Memorial at Council Oak Park in Tulsa. He is the president of the Apalache Foundation, which is sponsoring research into the advanced indigenous societies of the Lower Southeast.

9 Comments

  1. csmoke@webound.com'

    I have seen magazine articles in the past that there are a lot of Europeans who take on the culture of the old plains Inds. they live in tipis for months at a time, dress as plains people, big on crafts/beading/leather tanning/etc. I have corresponded with some…… I have followed a site in the past on primitive tanning and several of the participants were Europeans. they are what the politicians call the “true believers”. In the past, I did reinactments and we called it crossing the bridge to the past, but many do not “come back”.

    Reply
  2. Well, I know that a fascination with American Indian culture was a spin-off of the American Hippie Era in the early 1970s in Scandinavia. Young Swedish women would dress in “sort-of” Native American clothing as fashion statements. A very young Agnetha Faltskog (later in ABBA) like to dress up as an American Indians, because she had pronounced cheekbones and some other Asiatic features.

    Reply
  3. csmoke@webound.com'

    come to think about it , those European Inds, do look like modern Cherokees/others in the southeast…. bonnets/blue levis/etc. the Cherokees have forgotten who they are if they ever knew. I was never in abba band, but I do still have my 19ft tipi and bear claw necklace… no plastic or nylon.
    those European girls just have not researched enough, they do not realize most of the southeast Inds girls wore topless outfits most of the year… and traveled that way to Ind. territory.

    Reply
  4. csmoke@webound.com'

    by the way, remember “Iron Eyes Cody” ? He did tv commercials and I think some movies, dressed in his plains regalia… (he did the commercial of Ind on horse back looking at trash on ground, then close up of tear running down his cheek). When he took the spirit trail, they mentioned he was full blood, Italian. heh heh . guess you just have to look good.

    Reply
  5. madsceintest@aol.com'

    I would love to find out if I have cherokee blood for I have been told that I do

    Reply
    • Barbara, the problem is that there is NO DNA test marker for any Southeastern tribe. The best that you can do is show that you have Asiatic ancestry that is of the type normally seen in the indigenous peoples of the Americas. That is why I commented in the article about the descendants of the elite Cherokee families were about the only ones in Alabama and Georgia who can absolutely prove their heritage via a family genealogy. Most of the Cherokee families are somewhat anonymous. There were multiple wives and husbands, plus children born outside of marriage, which makes tracing family lines very difficult among the majority of Cherokees. There was a huge death rate among the Cherokees because of wars and plagues during much of the 1700s. Widows and widowers were constantly remarrying.

      Reply
  6. urisahatu@yahoo.com'

    Good article.

    I am going to say something that will offend most likely
    many POOF readers and in particular those who consider
    themselfs ‘true’ Cherokee.

    If my theory on the Chorokhi (Georgia – Caucasus) –
    Cherokee connection is proven, the Armenians on the
    pictures/photos could actually resemble the original
    so-called “true” Cherokee in Southeast North America
    since the Armenians are from the same Caucasus region
    as the Georgians or the Ajarians to be more precise.

    Armenia is a country bordering Georgia (Caucasus) and
    Turkey (Anatolia).
    ———

    There was an Armenian Empire which stretched from
    the Caspian Sea in the east to the Meditterranean Sea
    in the west.
    Map of The Armenian Empire:
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/72/Maps_of_the_Armenian_Empire_of_Tigranes.gif

    On the map you can see that The Armenian Empire at
    some point in time inculded parts of Anatolia (Turkey),
    Iraq, Syria and Israel (Kingdom of Jerusalem).
    Here you have the Caucasus, Anatolia and the Middle
    East combined which is in agreement with certain
    DNA research on the Cherokee.
    To the north west of Syria you can see a city named
    Tarsos in the part named “Cilicia”.

    Circa 1200 The Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia
    came into existence:
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/9e/Anatolia1200.png

    In a more detailed map you can find a placename
    “Corycos” directly north from northwest Cyprus
    (Famagusta).
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f7/Cilician_Armenia-en.svg/1500px-Cilician_Armenia-en.svg.png

    Although the names “Cilicia” and “Corycos” are less
    convincing than “Chorokhi” we should not rule out
    any possibilities.
    Now we have atleast two possible departure points
    for a possible origin of the Cherokee:
    1 – The Autonomous Republic Ajaria in Georgia
    (Caucasus): “Chorokhi” river delta near Batumi.
    2 – The Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia (Anatolia/Turkey):
    “Corycos”.

    This is my theory and should not be taken as fact
    until proven.

    Reply
    • No apology is necessary. We are looking for the truth, not doing research for a political agenda.

      Reply
      • urisahatu@yahoo.com'

        Indeed, We are looking for the truth.
        Hope this new research info on the origin of the
        Cherokee is helpful.

        Reply

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