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Images: The Tamaulipas-Chattahoochee Connection

Images:  The Tamaulipas-Chattahoochee Connection

During the past three decades,  Mexican archaeologists have begun to study the advanced cultures of Tamaulipas State, which adjoins the Gulf of Mexico and the US State of Texas.   When I was in college, the text books said that there were no advanced cultures or agriculture in Tamaulipas . . . totally false statements.

An advanced culture appeared on the coast of Tamualipas around 1000 AD  . . . at the same time that Etowah Mounds, Ichesi (Ocmulgee National Monument ~Lamar Village) and several other “Mississippian” mound town sites were being founded.   The original occupants of western Tamaulipas were driven out of the region by Chichimec barbarians around 1200 AD.   They were driven out of the coastal towns around 1250 AD . . . the same time period in which new occupants arrived at many town sites in Georgia and Alabama.

The photo above is of an earthen mound in Tampico, Tamaulipas.  Its original shape was pentagonal like the principal mounds on the Lower Chattahoochee River in Georgia and Alabama.   Its scale is identical to a five sided mound at the massive Rood’s Creek Archaeological Site in southwest Georgia.  Below is a virtual reality image of the mound at Roods Creek.  They were almost identical.

RoodsCreek2014-5

I have been able to translate several place names in Tamaulipas with Muskogean, Natchez or  Chitimacha dictionaries.   Several place names contain the Muskogean suffix, which means “offspring of.”

 

Mayas . . . Then and Now Series on POOF

COMPREHENSIVE RESEARCH ARTICLES

Part One – When the Mayas Invaded America

Part Two – Meeting the Mayas

Part Three –  New Understanding of Mesoamerican History Exactly Matches Creek Migration Legends

Part Four – Origins of the Mayas

Part Five – Symbols of Earliest Known Olmec Writing System Found in Florida and Georgia

Part Six – Five Waves of Maya Immigration into the Southeast

Part Seven – The Chichen Itza – Palenque Connection

SUPPLEMENTAL ARTICLES

The Many Migration Legends of the Creek People

Images: The Tamaulipas-Chattahoochee Connection

Image:  Maya “Indian Mounds” and the Creek Migration Legend

Images: The Coastal Marshes of Vera Cruz and Tabasco States

 Article: Are the Muskogee-Creek People Descendants of the Olmec Civilization?

Article: Did “Apocalypto” Really Happen?

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Richard Thornton is a professional architect, city planner, author and museum exhibit designer-builder. He is today considered one of the nation’s leading experts on the Southeastern Indians. However, that was not always the case. While at Georgia Tech Richard was the first winner of the Barrett Fellowship, which enabled him to study Mesoamerican architecture and culture in Mexico under the auspices of the Institutio Nacional de Antropoligia e Historia. Dr. Roman Piňa-Chan, the famous archaeologist and director of the Museo Nacional de Antropologia, was his fellowship coordinator. For decades afterward, he lectured at universities and professional societies around the Southeast on Mesoamerican architecture, while knowing very little about his own Creek heritage. Then he was hired to carry out projects for the Muscogee-Creek Nation in Oklahoma. The rest is history. Richard is the Tribal Historic Preservation Officer for the KVWETV (Coweta) Creek Tribe and a member of the Perdido Bay Creek Tribe. In 2009 he was the architect for Oklahoma’s Trail of Tears Memorial at Council Oak Park in Tulsa. He is the president of the Apalache Foundation, which is sponsoring research into the advanced indigenous societies of the Lower Southeast.

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