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Major Paleo-American Discovery in Yucatan

The Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia (INAH) in Mexico continues to be on the cutting edge of Paleo-American research. Most recently they have discovered the most complete Paleo-Indian skeleton. It belonged to a teenage girl, who feel down a hole about 13,000 years ago in the Yucatan Peninsula. Like all the other Paleo skeletons being found in Mexico, her genetic profile matches that of Southeast Asians and Proto-Polynesians from that era . . . not Siberians.

This particular version of the article includes some fascinating photography. I think that you will enjoy it.

If interested in learning more:

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Richard Thornton is a professional architect, city planner, author and museum exhibit designer-builder. He is today considered one of the nation’s leading experts on the Southeastern Indians. However, that was not always the case. While at Georgia Tech Richard was the first winner of the Barrett Fellowship, which enabled him to study Mesoamerican architecture and culture in Mexico under the auspices of the Institutio Nacional de Antropoligia e Historia. Dr. Roman Piňa-Chan, the famous archaeologist and director of the Museo Nacional de Antropologia, was his fellowship coordinator. For decades afterward, he lectured at universities and professional societies around the Southeast on Mesoamerican architecture, while knowing very little about his own Creek heritage. Then he was hired to carry out projects for the Muscogee-Creek Nation in Oklahoma. The rest is history.Richard is the Tribal Historic Preservation Officer for the KVWETV (Coweta) Creek Tribe and a member of the Perdido Bay Creek Tribe. In 2009 he was the architect for Oklahoma’s Trail of Tears Memorial at Council Oak Park in Tulsa. He is the president of the Apalache Foundation, which is sponsoring research into the advanced indigenous societies of the Lower Southeast.

2 Comments

  1. kingmidaz2000@yahoo.com'

    They still have no updates for headless mayan in tomb under Bonampak. No DNA or Carbon dating after 5 years.

    Reply
    • stoneriverpub@gmail.com'

      Right. There is a reason for that. It is very problematic for them. I know, since I am the one who gave National Geographic the ancient writings that revealed that tomb, and the history of the man found buried inside of it.

      They didn’t publish any of that. Silly racists and their childish emotions.

      Reply

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