Select Page

Next on POOF: Did Priests from eastern Peru guide the creation of the Hopewell Culture and several astronomical sites in the Southeast?

Next on POOF:   Did Priests from eastern Peru guide the creation of the Hopewell Culture and several astronomical sites in the Southeast?

 

In Part Two of our linguistic journey through time, the evidence for trans-Atlantic contacts tapers out, while influences from Pará (Upper Amazon Basin and Andes Foothills) becomes profound.  The oldest known Hopewell Style pottery is NOT in Ohio, but in a town site at the confluence of the Apalachicola and Cipola Rivers in the Florida Panhandle!   I found a north-south line of Eastern Peruvian place names that extends to eastern Ohio which was the heartland of the Hopewell Culture.  On the line that runs north from the mouth of the Apalachicola River are (1)  Kolomoki Mounds,  (2) the Mandeville site where the oldest Swift Creek pottery was unearthed,  (3) the Singer-Moye town site, which is aligned to the Pleiades, (4) a former stone complex on top of Kennesaw Mountain (5) the Ladd’s Mountain Observatory near Etowah Mounds and several other mountaintop shrines.

As many of you know,  the Hopewell Earthworks are almost identical to the geometric earthworks in eastern Peru and western Brazil.  However, they either predate or are contemporary with the Hopewell Culture.  All of these apparent Peruvian connections began shortly after the Paracusa People were driven out of their homeland on the coast of northwestern Peru.   Several different Peruvian and Amazonian peoples subsequently ended up in the Southeast over the next few centuries.  Wouldn’t you like to have a time machine?

Oh did I mention that Eastern Indian Corn and all commercial varieties of corn grown today in the United States are descended from a hybrid corn, developed by the indigenous peoples of Peru . . . not the aboriginal corn of Mexico?   

The following two tabs change content below.
Richard Thornton is a professional architect, city planner, author and museum exhibit designer-builder. He is today considered one of the nation’s leading experts on the Southeastern Indians. However, that was not always the case. While at Georgia Tech Richard was the first winner of the Barrett Fellowship, which enabled him to study Mesoamerican architecture and culture in Mexico under the auspices of the Institutio Nacional de Antropoligia e Historia. Dr. Roman Piňa-Chan, the famous archaeologist and director of the Museo Nacional de Antropologia, was his fellowship coordinator. For decades afterward, he lectured at universities and professional societies around the Southeast on Mesoamerican architecture, while knowing very little about his own Creek heritage. Then he was hired to carry out projects for the Muscogee-Creek Nation in Oklahoma. The rest is history. Richard is the Tribal Historic Preservation Officer for the KVWETV (Coweta) Creek Tribe and a member of the Perdido Bay Creek Tribe. In 2009 he was the architect for Oklahoma’s Trail of Tears Memorial at Council Oak Park in Tulsa. He is the president of the Apalache Foundation, which is sponsoring research into the advanced indigenous societies of the Lower Southeast.

7 Comments

  1. Bellcamp221@yahoo.com'

    Hey Richard I remember seeing pictures of earth works similar to the Brazilian one in the TVA collection of photos that the University of Kentucky has. If I’m not mistaken there were several at different locations. It’s been a couple of years since I have viewed them. diglib.lib.utk.edu

    Reply
  2. Reillyranch@aol.com'

    Your article is very timely. I just read another article about Inca masonry and how science is unraveling the intricate and large scale works of stone that have baffled scientists for centuries. According to the article the reddish mud and gold mortar that the Spaniards recorded 500 years ago was an acidic mud that generated sulphuric acid through a bacterial oxidation of pyrite. It was used to weather silica containing rocks by a silica gel mixed with the clay mineral kaolin. The acid mud allowed dissolving and softening of the rocks, superficially forming a viscoelastic silica gel. I didn’t understand most of the chemistry discussed but I recognized the minerals of kaolin and pyrite. According to the Washington County web page, Georgia is the leading producer of Kaolin and one of the top ten states for pyrite. The Kaolin is near Sandersonville and pyrite is found in the Piedmont plateau. It follows a narrow belt 100 to 150 miles wide just west of Atlanta to the South Carolina line just north of Toccoa. The larger rivers in the area have cut valleys and have left Yonah, Stone, and Kennesaw Mountians rising several hundred feet above the plane. Many of the pyrite deposits occur in these areas.

    Did the kaolin and pyrite deposits in Georgia attract the interest of Incas many centuries ago?

    Reply
    • Ed, the best that I can determine, these peoples were fleeing a bloodthirsty civilization that sacrificed their young people to offer their blood in the Highlands of Peru and overpopulation in the Amazon Basin. Unlike the situation in Mexico, the distance was too far for trade.

      Reply
      • Reillyranch@aol.com'

        Trade does seem out of the question, but what about relocation? Does the disappearance of the Inca population in Peru line up with any change or appearance of new population shift in the south eastern states? According to another article “their capital the Sacred City of Caral – a 5,000-year-old metropolis complete with complex agricultural practices, rich culture, and monumental architecture, including six large pyramidal structures, stone and earthen platform mounds, temples, amphitheatre, sunken circular plazas, and residential areas.” It is the first known civilization of the Americas and lasted until around 1800 BC, after which the settlements were abandoned. Could they have been forced out due to a severe drought? Where did they go?
        Wall Carvings Depict a Starving Civilization’s Pleas to a Water Deity
        3,800 years ago, the people living in what is now called Vichama, Peru carved snakes and human heads into their walls alongside depictions of emaciated people. They were starving and dying and hoped a water deity would finally be lenient and send them some rain to let their friends, family, and neighbors survive.
        DW reports the recently revealed Peruvian wall carvings stretch across a one meter (3.2 feet) high and 2.8 meters (9.2 feet) long adobe wall at the entry point of a ceremonial hall. The wall relief depicts four human heads with their eyes-closed and two snakes passing between and around them. These two snakes have their heads pointing at the image of what DW describes as “a humanoid seed symbol that is digging into the soil.”

        Haven’t you compared the terrain of the southeast US to that of Peru? Maybe they found the similarities of territory and mineral resources compatible for relocation.

        Reply
      • Teillyranch@aol.com'

        Trading over that distance would be impractical. What about relocation? I read another article that said “their capital was the Sacred City of Caral – a 5,000-year-old metropolis complete with complex agricultural practices, rich culture, and monumental architecture, including six large pyramidal structures, stone and earthen platform mounds, temples, amphitheatre, sunken circular plazas, and residential areas.” It is the first known civilization of the Americas and lasted until around 1800 BC, after which the settlements were abandoned. Could they have been forced out due to a severe drought? Where did they go? Wall Carvings Depict a Starving Civilization’s Pleas to a Water Deity
        3,800 years ago, the people living in what is now called Vichama, Peru carved snakes and human heads into their walls alongside depictions of emaciated people. They were starving and dying and hoped a water deity would finally be lenient and send them some rain to let their friends, family, and neighbors survive.
        DW reports the recently revealed Peruvian wall carvings stretch across a one meter (3.2 feet) high and 2.8 meters (9.2 feet) long adobe wall at the entry point of a ceremonial hall. The wall relief depicts four human heads with their eyes-closed and two snakes passing between and around them. These two snakes have their heads pointing at the image of what DW describes as “a humanoid seed symbol that is digging into the soil.”

        I wonder if their sudden abandonment of their cities coincides with an increase in population in the southeastern US?

        Reply
        • I think they did relocate. Huge sections of the Southeast were Arawak or Panoan from South America.

          Reply
  3. ah.all@inorbit.com'

    Regarding Ed’s comment about dissolving rock surfaces to prepare them for precise shaping of the stones used in massive architectural projects in South America and Central America, Costa Rican researcher Ivar Zapp proposed, in his book Atlantis in America: Navigators of the Ancient World (By Ivar Zapp, George Erikson) the same process in order to create the numerous, nearly perfect spheres found, mainly, in the Diquis Delta between the Rio Grande de Terraba and the Rio Seirpe, exactly due south, (-83.4 longitude) of the several of the aforementioned sites in Florida and Georgia. Hundreds of stone spheres, ranging in size from a few centimeters to several meters were found when United Fruit Company cleared land for banana plantations in the early 20th century. Zapp proposed, rather reasonably, the stones at the Diquis Delta were arranged in specific patterns, indicating exact locations of major ports around the world, making the Diquis a navigational university. We know from a number of early accounts that mica was highly sought by early occupants of the Americas. It’s use in the formula to dissolve rock surfaces provides evidence that it was valued for more than just cladding on finished structures.

    Reply

Leave a Reply to Ed Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Subscribe to POOF via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this website and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 787 other subscribers

The Information World is changing!

People of One Fire needs your help to evolve with it.

We are now celebrating the 11th year of the People of One Fire. In that time, we have seen a radical change in the way people receive information. The magazine industry has almost died. Printed newspapers are on life support. Ezines, such as POOF, replaced printed books as the primary means to present new knowledge. Now the media is shifting to videos, animated films of ancient towns, Youtube and three dimensional holograph images.

During the past six years, a privately owned business has generously subsidized my research as I virtually traveled along the coast lines and rivers of the Southeast. That will end in December 2017. I desperately need to find a means to keep our research self-supporting with advertising from a broader range of viewers. Creation of animated architectural history films for POOF and a People of One Fire Youtube Channel appears to be the way. To do this I will need to acquire state-of-art software and video hardware, which I can not afford with my very limited income. Several of you know personally that I live a very modest lifestyle. If you can help with this endeavor, it will be greatly appreciated.

Support Us!

Richard Thornton . . . the truth is out there somewhere!

Pin It on Pinterest