Select Page

People of One Fire Genetics and Language Message Board

People of One Fire Genetics and Language Message Board

 

If you have information or questions about the genetics and languages of Southeastern Native Americans, please post them here as comments.  You may also post information about genealogical discoveries.  It would be helpful if you put links to this page on your Facebook page, so the general public will be aware of its existence.  Your comments will not appear instantly because they are monitored, but will be published as soon as possible.  We intend this webpage to replace the old Creek-Southeast Message Board, which no longer exists. 

The following two tabs change content below.
Richard Thornton is a professional architect, city planner, author and museum exhibit designer-builder. He is today considered one of the nation’s leading experts on the Southeastern Indians. However, that was not always the case. While at Georgia Tech Richard was the first winner of the Barrett Fellowship, which enabled him to study Mesoamerican architecture and culture in Mexico under the auspices of the Institutio Nacional de Antropoligia e Historia. Dr. Roman Piňa-Chan, the famous archaeologist and director of the Museo Nacional de Antropologia, was his fellowship coordinator. For decades afterward, he lectured at universities and professional societies around the Southeast on Mesoamerican architecture, while knowing very little about his own Creek heritage. Then he was hired to carry out projects for the Muscogee-Creek Nation in Oklahoma. The rest is history. Richard is the Tribal Historic Preservation Officer for the KVWETV (Coweta) Creek Tribe and a member of the Perdido Bay Creek Tribe. In 2009 he was the architect for Oklahoma’s Trail of Tears Memorial at Council Oak Park in Tulsa. He is the president of the Apalache Foundation, which is sponsoring research into the advanced indigenous societies of the Lower Southeast.

44 Comments

  1. revcdp@gmail.com'

    Richard,

    I recently did the AncestryDNA test. All my life I had been told that my grandmother was part Cherokee. When the DNA results came back, I discovered that I had not a twirl on the Native American genetic swirl ladder. I did however have a good bit of Sephardic Jew DNA. Grandma and her mom did look far more Jewish than Cherokee.

    Reply
    • A lot of people in the Lower Southeast are making this discovery. Also, one of the most important Creek families of the late 1700s and early 1800s, which included General William McIntosh, had substantial Sephardic and Ashkinazi Jewish heritage.

      Reply
      • wrapscallionn@gmail.com'

        See… there was a largish Jewish town somewhere in the Carolinas before there were Cherokees there. I think Richard even has a map showing the location of it.

        Reply
        • cassiehall0017@gmail.com'

          Love to see the map if someone could provide link please. Christopher Pierce if you wish to double check that analysis, you need to upload your raw dna file to GEDmatch.com (it’s free). I have helped many acquaintances connect to the Native admixture that was essentially washed out by the analyzing technique which Ancestry employed as recently as at least within this past year and so on previously (I have made copies of the written process Ancestry outlined regarding their procedure- it’s not a complete capture but rather a sampling based interpretation system utilizing under and over represented reference populations, none of which correlate directly to any reference populations specifically of SE Native tribes living now). I work with DNA analysis regularly and serve as an admin over at FamilyTreeDNA. I am sometimes able to help folks sequence the formerly ‘ignored’ Native segments from Ancestry and the other major testing companies in a technique which requires time and patience but by which process it is possible for one to actually narrow down the sequenced genome to identified exact Native or mixed Native segments of dna with a further indication of which lines or DNA cousin matches a given newly identified Native segment. I can list any exact matches to an identified Native segment within the tested database and this is dependent on one having 2-8th cousins among those tested. Have yet to meet a SE descendant who had trouble finding enough matches to sequence for the matched native segments. Folks are generally looking for a lot of the same thing it seems.
          The goal is to help those wishing to reconnect with their indigenous roots- but it only works if there are, in fact, roots to be found… The success rate has been great, however that is subject to some bias on my part as I tend to be around Native cousins and friends of ours, regional associates of some lines connecting to SE geographical territories, etc… unless I’m traveling outside the States which would mean I’m on a vacation and not analyzing DNA 🙂 Anyway, if you are serious about potentially narrowing down your scope using genealogy on your end with some help via analysis, feel free to message me for more info. I have seen many cases where there is obvious Native for similar situations, more often than not actually. None of what I am referring to is even branching out into creatively re-naming other regional ethnic designation either. Native period. You’re welcome to email me through the link on my Word Press user page listed below for additional info. Don’t be discouraged and don’t believe anyone who asserts they can tell you your heritage based on a limited interpretation model and biased judgements rather than combing back through and telling you with certainty whether you in fact have a true and completely non-Native admixture. In a nutshell, the law of averages can wipe out upward of 10% Native of any given chromosome which is where you actually inherited that autosomal admixture total- you had 23 chromosomes averaged out and if the Native occurred sporadically through those specific ancestors into your span of 23 chromosomes (usually the case with SE descendants), you could be lucky and get all of what either parent had to give a child within the 50% random genetic material which is taken from each parent’s 100% total along those chromosomes not along an averages pie chart! This phenomena breaks my heart. People have literally been devastated and even humiliated after thinking their family oral traditions were all false. I see bullies from the core federally recognized tribes poke fun at the other ‘side’ about being only dinky percent Native and in some cases folks have been shamed and ostracized. Sounds like it’s (hopefully) not that type of situation base on what folks here tend to write, but I might be able to help just the same… This comment here goes for other DNA profiled POOF readers who might be at a genetic dilemma regarding their ‘missing’ Native genes.
          Wado
          Cassie

          Reply
          • wrapscallionn@gmail.com'

            I know mine is going to show jewish heritage , it wont bw a surprise to me. An ancestral line , the Furrs , married into a swiss jewish line called the Zuppingers.

  2. abbahawk@hotmail.com'

    regarding genealogy. at overtonsonly@hotmail.com, they maintain a database of 15,000 Overtons, almost all American & biggest part SE US. many of the latter have traditions of native ancestry, mostly Creek. & one group has the Iberian Jewish YDNA, from the mining villages of East Tenn/West NC. They are always willing to help & pass on data.

    Reply
  3. theeps1@hotmail.com'

    I appreciate any assistance in my genealogical research in this area . . . I’ve only recently discovered relations from GA . . . This has led me to do some book, article, thesis & dissertation reading to get an understanding of the area/time . . . Relations I’ve found so far were located in northern GA . . . My AncestryDNA & 23andmeDNA results, and my father having said we have “Native American” have compelled me to look more into this possible connection

    Reply
    • Edward, you need to tell readers, what specific assistance you need.

      Reply
      • theeps1@hotmail.com'

        I’m trying to research the history of Northern to Middle Georgia in the 1800s-1900s to understand the conditions my relatives were living in & would like to receive input here from persons familiar with this history . . . I’ve found them in the Clayton, Greene, Talbot, Taliaferro & Warren areas thus far . . . Some others through another branch were from Alabama, but I’d like to focus on the Northern to Middle Georgia cluster for now

        Reply
        • summerfordtim61@gmail.com'

          Matt I’m from Sand Mountain and I cant remember what site I saw it on and didn’t pay much attention at the time but it was about the first jews on Sand Mountain was around Rainsville area about 1610 Had a name of Kaplan decendants are Kaplan Shirt Factory in Chattanooga Tn

          Reply
    • abbahawk@hotmail.com'

      for research, we use familytree.org it is free, & find-a-grave. & for genealogy program brotherskeeper is free download. I have used it 20+ years.

      Reply
    • theeps1@hotmail.com'

      I’d like input on the Native American presence/admixture in northern Georgia . . . Especially in the county areas currently known as Clayton, Greene, Taliaferro & Warren please

      Reply
      • Clayton was Muskogee Creek in the 1700s and early 1800s, which is the case for almost all the Flint River Basin. Greene was Okvte (Water People) They were a hybrid people whose commoners were originally Uchee and their elite, Itza Maya. Their language was a mixture of Itza Maya and Chickasaw, more commonly known today as Hitchiti.

        Taliaferro and Warren Counties, like all counties in the Ogeechee River Basin, were Uchee. The principal town of this Uchee province was on the headwaters of the Ogeechee in Taliaferro County. It has at least three mounds still existing today.

        Reply
        • theeps1@hotmail.com'

          Thank you for the response . . . These relatives of mine span from 1805-1870 (Talbot as well) . . . Also, was there considerable “admixture” taking place during this time?

          Reply
          • Yes, it was typical for Creeks and Uchees in eastern Georgia to marry off as many children as possible to their non-Indigenous natives in order to cement good relations and comply with Creek Law which forbade marriage to close relatives.

          • Cassiehall0017@gmaIl.com'

            Richard, are you saying the Italian surname Taliaferro, often anglicized ‘Tolliver’ in laters year, was a County Name in Georgia where Uchee people dwelled? So they had a “Uchee County” named after an old Italian lineage that tricled into Western Europe/France and into Great Britain in many branches whereupon a lineage emigrated to Georgia (by way of Virginia, presumably). and the County had no Italian or English population of heavy Anglo or Southern- Western etc European heritage? PS the Taliaferro and associated Tolliver lines I’ve viewed at-DNA on all showed a good degree of Italian heritage to this day- minimal Native, but it would seem a reasonable progression of logic to wonder why in the world a family fitting a Jewish diaspora migratory pattern at the correct point in time would also be the namesake of an Euchee principal town… in Georgia

          • Taliaferro (/ˈtɒlɪvər/ TOL-i-vər), also spelled Talliaferro, Tagliaferro, Talifero, Tellifero or Taliferro and sometimes anglicised to Tolliver or Toliver,[1] is a prominent family in eastern Virginia and Maryland. The Taliaferros (originally Tagliaferro, Italian pronunciation: [ˌtaʎʎaˈfɛrro], which means “ironcutter” in Italian) are one of the early families who settled in Virginia in the 17th century. They migrated from London, where an ancestor had served as a musician in the court of Queen Elizabeth I. The surname in that line is believed to trace back to Bartholomew Taliaferro, a native of Venice who settled in London and was made a denizen in 1562.

            It was named Talliaferro County after the Uchee’s land was ceded to the United States by the Creek Confederacy. The Uchee town was named Cassie, which is the Uchee word for sub-species of bobcat that is especially inquisitive.

          • abbahawk@hotmail.com'

            a quick look at NC as late as 1790 census, shows many listing for FPC (free people of colour,at that time, meaning anyone who did NOT look Anglo-Saxon). many Jewish names, Cohen(Cone) Levi, levy, Jacobs etc. I am deeply involved with Overton family projects. at FamilytreeDNA, 1 clan is Iberian Jewish (most others are Kelts), but we have them back to 1700s in mts in SE. Many of the Spanish explorers were Marranos & vanished into boonies. The interesting questions is, did they start the Jewish mining villages, are just join the ones already there.
            Side notes. Elvis was technically Jewish by maternal ancestry & religious law. many historians, including Spanish ones, are certain that C Columbus was a Spanish marrano, that the Italian aspect was protective sham in 1490s. lots of arguments on that tho. It is known that as most of his crews were from prisons & there were many Marranos & Jews being held. His interpreter was a Torres, who spoke a # of languages & traditionally 1st ashore & asked the Indians in Hebrew, “are you Jewish”.

  4. contact@jonathanrex.com'

    There is a very strong reason to believe (plenty of evidence) that the genetic results showing Sephardic Jewish (Iberian markers) is due to faulty assumptions by those interpreting the results. The exact same markers have been found in the mitochondrial (maternal) markers of several elongated skulls from Peru from 3,000 years ago. These markers have been called “Iberian” because they are found in Sephardic Jewish people from Morocco, Egypt, Israel, and Turkey who took these tests early on to trace their Jewish ancestry. The markers were labeled “Jewish” but the actual markers are older than Israel and the tribe of Judah. They weren’t Jews and Cherokee with these markers weren’t Jews. Some of these Cherokee, like some ancient Peruvians Paracans with elongated skulls, come from the same people as Sephardic Jews throughout the Iberian Peninsula who were called Phoenicians. They had reddish and blondish hair, light brown skin, and commonly had green eyes. They crossed to Mexico and Peru from West Africa along the South Atlantic current and spread out north along the eastern Native trade route that ran from Brazil up through the Yucatan, Mexico, the Natchez lands in Mississippi, throughout the islands of Cuba and Jamaica, and up through Florida into Georgia, Alabama, and Tennessee. They also continued across the Pacific from Peru and settled in New Zealand prior to the Maori who themselves have told researchers there were lighter skinned, narrow nosed, red and blonde haired people with brown freckles there when they arrived. This is a trait many who identify as Cherokee but who don’t look “Indian” have. These people have all likely been in the Americas for 3,000 years and lived in every way as Natives among various tribes. They formed the ancient Kituwa tradition and may have descended from the Biblical Abraham’s 3rd wife Keturah.

    Abraham’s 3rd wife is almost never talked about. Her title was Uku’Keturah (The Owl of the Sacred Fire). Ukuku was Sumerian. Uku was the sound that the Ukuku made. She was said to have come from the lands that are now eastern Turkey, the exact same lands where the Paracas skulls of Peru come from through their mitochondrial markers. The Cherokee word Ukuku or Uguku also means “Owl” just as it did in Sumeria and “Ani” is a prefix used by the seven Cherokee Clans (Aniwaya = Wolf People). It means “people” just as it did in Ani, the capital city of Ancient Anatolia. Uku is a title given to the Beloved Man of the Cherokee and during the 1700’s was the name of one of Moytoy of Tellico’s sons: Uku’ulah. Attakullakulla was Ada’Uku’ulah also. The name was a title for all of the sons of, by birth or adoption, of Ama’matai. Not surprisingly the Samoan people also use the “Ama Matai” word for their chiefs who they call “F’amatai. It meant “Water Masters”. Chi’riccia’riccua in Peru meant “Hawks of Five Waters” or “The Hawks of Five Seas”. All over North and South America ancient remains of red and blond haired people with hawk-like nose bone structures have been found.

    There were Jews who mixed in with the Cherokee throughout the 1600’s and 1700’s so this complicates issues a bit in determining which is which. Sequoyah’s English name was George Gist because his father Nathaniel Gist was Jewish. Mordecai Gist was a cousin of Nathaniel Gist and Christopher Gist (mentor to the young President George Washington) was the paternal grandfather of Sequoyah. Sequoyah’s mother was half African and Cherokee. Culturally Sequoyah was raised Cherokee and had no identity with either his white or black sides though so people who focus on that are just being _____________ (fill in the blank). James Adair of Ireland (the merchant) was Jewish so all Cherokee, Creeks, and Chickasaw with the last name Adair are part-Jewish. Christian Priber of Germany was also Jewish so any Natives with that name are as well. Most modern “fullblood” Cherokee are a mix of Scottish with Native. But the traditional Kituwa were a matrilineal priesthood in all of the Mississippian Era towns. Wherever there was a sacred fire kept burning in a temple atop a mound or pyramid there were red headed, lighter skinned, Kituwa priests. They are who Kukulkan or Quetzalcoatl stories were based on – The Feathered Serpent and Double Serpent symbolism through Ancient American cultures is rooted in this esoteric gnostic cult of the Serpent that traces back into Ancient Egypt, Ancient Sumeria, and Ancient India. Most likely its roots are in Gobekli Tepi. Queen Nefertiti came from the same matrilineal priestess line of these people. It was the matrilineal line that mattered among these people and is why so many white people have great-grandma “Cherokee Princess” stories. It was “Priestess” and not “Princess”. Most of these people who take a DNA test will discover that their matrilineal line appears to be Sephardic Jewish because Sephardic Jews are the only modern recognized people to carry the markers today.

    Reply
    • andreasost@hotmail.com'

      The difference between the Israelites & Phoenicians, was only religious. Their languages/dialects were mutually understandable? & there was continual interaction in Biblical times. So the genetics back then would have been the same. ANI is Hebrew for “I’ or “Me”.

      Reply
      • Thank you! Keep on making comments. This is why we created the message board.

        Reply
      • contact@jonathanrex.com'

        Right, but before anybody ever mentioned a Yehuda (Judah) or Isis-Ra-El (Israel) there were people called Phoenicians and genetically these people originated with distinct markers in what is now Eastern Turkey. They stem from the oldest verified ancient agricultural society that formed near Gobekli Tepi and spread out. Those ancient people became the Scythians and Phoenicians, Habiru (Hebrew), and Aryans of India. Some also spread east into China. The word Wodan (Odin) attests to this. Wodan was a Scythian word for a Shaman or Wizard. Wido was a variant of the word in China. The Viking Odin was a Scythian wizard who traveled to Scandinavia and founded the Viking royal line which King Hrothgar came from. Slavic people also come from those ancient Scythians. As they spread out from Central Eurasia the Celtic and Pictish people moved west into what is now Poland before continuing into Germany, France and the British islands. At the same time they spread out around the Iberian Peninsula with their genetics mutating in different regions. There is a clan among the Cherokee called the Ani’tawodi (Hawk People) which has been shortened to Ani’wodi (Red Paint Clan). The word Wodi comes from Wodan. The Ani’tawodi or Ani’wodi were the clan that made the war paint and produced medicine men and medicine women. The history of the world is far more complex than the simplistic narratives can explain. The idea of the “Indian” was fabricated by pseudo-scientist Europeans who had already decided that all Natives in the Americas had come across from Siberia into Alaska. We know that’s not true now. Without a doubt. The Vikings crossed regularly from 1,000 years ago on and called eastern Canada “Vinland”. Africans under Abu Bukari II crossed form West Africa to the Yucatan before Columbus and even Columbus made note that there were black tribes at war with the brown skinned tribes. The Spaniards even supplied the brown skinned tribes with weapons to defeat the much stronger black skinned tribes in exchange for gold and offered to help them. The Spanish made slaves of those black skinned tribes when they captured many of them, relocating them to different regions. Not all African Americans today are from people who were brought from Africa as slaves. Some crossed on their own and became slaves later through warfare in the Americas. Hell, two of the men that sailed with Columbus (the Nino brothers) were black men. They piloted two of the ships and had already visited the Americas before him which is how he was so certain they could reach new lands by that route. The history taught is a watered down linear narrative. It makes for simple explanations but it’s not true at all.

        Reply
        • janymoo@fidnet.com'

          WOW! This is fantastic reading.

          Reply
  5. 50brickwalls@comcast.net'

    I need help to locate and identify Choctaw in Oklahoma, possibly Chickasaw or Creek too. My ggrandmother and her father were full blood Choctaw and registered Dawes and both born Indian Territory. But her mother died when she was young (1878) and the family name has been lost. Records for this period of Indian Territory are very scarce and dna is hopefully a way to identify previous generations. I also have 2 cousins who are also Native American at 25% and 35% and one of them from our male line who matches no one for Y-dna. My mt-dna is A2, widely accepted as the Americas thousands of years ago. Family surname is Brown but does not match other Brown’s. They lived in McAlester/Atoka area for many years. I’ve tested ancestry, 23andme and Family Tree dna with all uploaded to gedmatch. On the genetics side I need help because there are very few segments we all match that are the same. In fact, we have lots of matches with many other Choctaw families. There is apparently no Jewish dna and no African American or very little. One person who I match on a very small segment says possibly Catawba / Saponi. I recently found a statement from a uncle who said our maternal grandfather (other side) was distant Cherokee. 95% of my maternal ancestry comes from the south but I am unable to identify who these people were. My ancestral history is heavy on North Atlantic, Irish, Scottish, Swedish and German with the NA at 12%. My paternal line is mostly French Canadian with the Swedish and German immigrants. I was adopted so I have no family stories. Please contact me at 50brickwallsatcomcast.net if you can assist me, know any good leads or someone I can hire to help sort this out.

    Reply
    • Have you considered that your family was Uchee, who were assigned to a Choctaw area? Brown is a very common Uchee family name, both in Oklahoma and Georgia. Virtually, none of the Uchee in eastern Georgia were deported to either Alabama or Oklahoma during the Trail of Tears period. Then, during the Second and Third Seminole Wars, hundreds of Uchee families in eastern Georgia, who were legally citizens of the state, were illegally arrested, their property seized and given to white planters, then marched in chains to the Alabama line. From their they had to make their way to Oklahoma, but were assigned to Choctaw territory. I know that all my Uchee relatives, who were rounded up, were forced to live in the Choctaw Nation and then were put on the Dawes List as Choctaws . . . even though they didn’t have a drop of Choctaw blood. The Uchee and Creeks in Northeast Georgia, who were Methodists, escaped this outrage because the Methodist Church protected them. Baptist Uchees were generally not protected by their congregations.

      Reply
      • 50brickwalls@comcast.net'

        Thanks Richard. Yes I am interested to check Uchee markers. How do I find out Uchee markers? I also have a lot of matches in Georgia, North Carolina and Alabama. My McElhaney lines (VA to AR to OK) married Cox, Jones, Ledbetters, McDaniels, Green. The Motes lines were Quakers from Ohio to South Carolina; Goggans, Collier. Surnames associated with my Choctaw/Brown ancestors based on dna matches with incomplete genealogical data; Frazier, Durant, Kaniatobe, LeFlore, Wilson, Jones, Pitchlynn, York, Reed, Hudson, Byington. I suspect a connection with Moshulatubbe’s full blood daughters, names unknown. They were not very religious but associated with Cyrus Byington the preacher who Henry Byington Choctaw was named after. I believe his name was Henry Graves before changing it to Byington. My gggrandfather Moses Brown’s father is noted on his Dawes card as John Brown. John Brown apparently died before 1896 and buried in an unmarked grave in an unknown field somewhere in Indian Territory. Accordingly he was from Jack’s Fork before the counties were renamed.

        Reply
        • Uchee descendants will show up with Sami (Lapp), Scandinavian, Finish, Basque or Cier-reigh Irish (Black Irish) DNA and often Panoan from South America . . . yet have no known Scandinavian or Basque ancestors. I am not a genealogist, but there are readers of POOF, who are.

          Reply
  6. iwg42@hotmail.com'

    Hey Richard,
    Another piece of the DNA puzzle from the Tanio
    https://arstechnica.com/science/2018/02/natives-of-the-caribbean-wiped-out-during-colonization-left-dna-behind/?comments=1
    If more scientist keep looking at the DNA of Native Americans maybe they will finally come up with markers to help ID more migration routes to North America. Maybe they need to go to the SE coastal plain and Florida and take DNA samples from people there.
    Thanks and keep up the good work!

    Reply
  7. janymoo@fidnet.com'

    It is unbelievable how much work you have done. You have enlightened us all. Bravo on your new venture.

    Reply
  8. wrapscallionn@gmail.com'

    My lines are Ray , Durden, Hooks , Furr, Mayo on moms side, and Helms , Hawsey , McCurdy , Bowen on dad’s side. Bowen is possible Lumbee , Hawsey is creek, Durden and Ray are possible Choctaw.

    Reply
  9. Buffybeau52@gmail.com'

    I have great interest in understanding the DNA of the Muskogee Creek people in Georgia, Alabama, and Florida. We link directly to Peter Anderson (my 4th great-grandfather), the first name on the 1832 Creek Census of Cubihatcha Town. We recently completed DNA tests with Ancestry,com. My father’s ethnicity matches return as: Great Britain 77%, Scandinavia 8%, Europe West 4%, Ireland/Scotland/Wales 3%, Europe East 2%, European Jewish < 1%, Africa North < 1%, Cameroon/Congo < 1%, Mali < 1%, Senegal < 1%, Melanesia < 1%, Iberian Peninsula < 1%, and Caucasus < 1%.

    My DNA ethnicity profile: Scandinavia 25%, Europe West 24%, Ireland/Scotland/Wales 22%, Great Britain 22%, Iberian Peninsula 2%, Europe South 1%, Middle East 2%, Finland/Northwest Russia < 1%, Europe East < 1%.

    The surprise is that there is no Native American or Panoan connection for either of us. Can anyone help us understand how our DNA is connected with the Southeastern Muskogee? We are members of the Lower Muskogee Creek Tribe based in Whigham, GA. Any help in understanding the DNA profiles are welcomed.

    Thank you, Janet

    Reply
    • First of all, it is completely possible for all evidence of Native American ancestry to be wiped out in one generation because of the way that genes are passed on to children. Secondly, it looks like your “Native American” ancestry is Uchee. Full-blooded Uchees are showing up with almost no Native American DNA because of the way that commercial labs are equating Native American heritage to similarity to Canadian Algonquians. They give percentages of ethnicity, but that is not really how DNA testing works. Your DNA is compared by a computer for it similarity to a variety of ethnic groups. Since there are no Creek or Uchee DNA test markers, you are not being compared to the ethnic group from which you are descended.

      Reply
  10. cshadowolf@gmail.com'

    This is very interesting. I only met my natural father twice. He was very tall and looked full blood native American but was most likely not. My mother’s husband is of Scots/English and French origin. This man Jim possibly Jim Davis of Guymon, OK claimed he was Cherokee. I am told by a relation from Tennessee whom I worked with in Florida that the family is in fact part Cherokee and that some hid out form the Soldiers and others were included in the forced march to Oklahoma known as the Trail of Tears. Some followed afterwards. My DNA report was not that good from Ancestry.com. However, I learned that CRI genetics had a much better database of Native markers and so I managed to do their test. My DNA test was very surprising. The Davis family I probably belong to is from the southern Appalachians. Could he have said Chiraqui instead of Cherokee. I was just a child then. Sounds the same. Or are we one of those who got lumped in with them. No North American markers showed up. However, I have Peruvian, Columbian, Mexican, Puerto Rican, Several Indian markers, Punjabi and Bengali and one other. Plus Vietnamese and Japanese markers. Plus Toscani Italian and the expected blend of European, British with a lot of Finnish coming in after colonization of the Americas by white folks. My mother is a Noonan/Baker her husband is a Waugh/Murwt. Jim Davis is unknown but the Davis name is British and originates from Davidson clan in Scotland and spread south under various derivatives. I found a Sarah Louise Gipson who was in several linked family trees and the grandmother of a James K Davis who is a possible match as my father. She is from McMinn county TN. General area of your research. Ancestry was good for links. It served to prove this man Jim was my natural father. I was born in Guymon, OK. So, the Davis clan there is a possible research lead to follow in Oklahoma.

    Reply
  11. janymoo@fidnet.com'

    What would we do with out Richard and his wonderful group? Working together maybe history can be made right. I feel like a sponge trying to soak up everything i read. When i started my journey 12 years ago i had very little info to go on. I had been told that N.A. blood was in our tree, well that started the hunt. I solved many lines, but the N.A. was a bust they claimed i have Iberian Peninsula, and east Asia. If i hadn’t found your site i would have given up. Ten years later more DNA and now they tell i have 1.60 N.A. Just by accident i was reading the AARP magazine and i came across a article about the Panama’s Gulf of Chiriqui, when i put that through translation it sounds just like Cherokee. Their must be a connection. I am sure you all know more about this and can enlighten me.

    Reply
  12. wrapscallionn@gmail.com'

    Just found out — my Gibson ancestor was born in Spanish Florida in 1818 , about where Euchee Anna , Florida is now. And just found where my suspected Cherokee line , the Lanterns from north of the Nacoochee Valley , were ” mulatto ” on 1870 census, where they had been called white in previous ones. ( thjs guys father, i also found out , wws delinquent on a tax owed on himself in 1797— what is that about ?)

    And Richard , have you ever heard of ” Otoe ” Tribe ?

    Reply
  13. gerard728@gmail.com'

    I am on a search for information about Charles Miller and William Miller. Both signed the 1825 Treaty of Indian Springs on behalf of the Creek Nation and from what little information I’ve been able to get off the internet, Charles was close to William McIntosh. I suspect both may have been sons of John Miller of Augusta who was referred to as a trader to the Uchee and served as an Uchee interpreter on occasion. My 5X great grandfather was Charles Miller who died in Hancock County, Georgia in 1823. In the old family Bible it names his parents as John and Jemima. I had a DNA test and my brother had one as well with a different company. Both tests turned up a 2nd to 4th cousin relationship with descendants of James A. Miller of Hancock County. This James Miller was born in 1822 in Virginia. The reason I’m posting this is because before my father died in 1995, he told an older brother of mine that we were related to William McIntosh. He never shared that with me and I honestly don’t know where or why he thought that. I’d love to correspond by email with descendants of the Creek Charles Miller and William Miller to see if that has any basis in fact.

    Reply

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Subscribe to POOF via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this website and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 734 other subscribers

The Information World is changing!

People of One Fire needs your help to evolve with it.

We are now celebrating the 11th year of the People of One Fire. In that time, we have seen a radical change in the way people receive information. The magazine industry has almost died. Printed newspapers are on life support. Ezines, such as POOF, replaced printed books as the primary means to present new knowledge. Now the media is shifting to videos, animated films of ancient towns, Youtube and three dimensional holograph images.

During the past six years, a privately owned business has generously subsidized my research as I virtually traveled along the coast lines and rivers of the Southeast. That will end in December 2017. I desperately need to find a means to keep our research self-supporting with advertising from a broader range of viewers. Creation of animated architectural history films for POOF and a People of One Fire Youtube Channel appears to be the way. To do this I will need to acquire state-of-art software and video hardware, which I can not afford with my very limited income. Several of you know personally that I live a very modest lifestyle. If you can help with this endeavor, it will be greatly appreciated.

Support Us!

Richard Thornton . . . the truth is out there somewhere!

Pin It on Pinterest