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Radio show on the Mayas in Georgia

Radio show on the Mayas in Georgia

 

The sound track of a radio talk show from 2016 has been placed on Youtube for the public’s enjoyment.  This marked the first time that a journalist had ever interviewed me about the Mayas In Georgia Thang.   As stated in the program, there was a news blackout in Georgia during 2012 and 2013, about the filming in Georgia and broadcast of the premier of American Unearthed.

There was something else that POOF readers should know about the behind-the-scene-events associated with the strange news blackout and the bizarre behavior of bureaucrats in the Gainesville, GA US Forest Service Office.  They refused to allow film crews from National Geo, PBS and History Channel to film the Track Rock ruins, but allowed the Travel Channel to shoot a program there.   I really didn’t know why, when I was interviewed by this program.

Western North Carolina and extreme northern edge of North Georgia is considered by honest law enforcement officers to be the meth capital of the world.  Illegal meth manufacturing and distribution corrupt everything they touch.  Track Rock Gap is in the southern section of that organized crime zone.  Significant profits from the drug running . . . just as in the old moonshine days . . . in funneled into neo-Nazi, paramilitary operations in the region. In return, these morons provide protection from the “Marxist Socialist” DEA agents trying to stop the drug operations.  There was a paramilitary training camp directly adjacent to Track Rock Gap in 2012.

It took me a long time to figure out what has actually transpired over the past 10 years.  During the spring of 2010, while I was living in a tent in the North Carolina Mountains,  a major scandal broke out in regard to the US Forest Service offices in Gainesville, GA and Murphy, NC.   Federal investigators had determined that high-and-middle level USFS personnel were protecting major drug dealers, operating in the region AND requiring potential vendors to make political contributions to certain Republican candidates, associated with the Dixie Mafia (Georgia) and Russian Mafia (North Carolina) in order to do business with the USFS.  In fact, it was other Republican candidates, who first complained.

Perhaps the largest recipient of these illegal political donations was Congressman Nathan Deal of Gainesville!  The day before he was to be tried by the House of Representatives and probably impeached, he resigned from Congress.  Within a few months, he was running for governor and was elected.

So . . . Track Rock Gap is situated in a criminal/Neo-Nazi cesspool.  Those involved are paranoid of both being busted and their neighbors finding out that indeed . . . they are not rich because God has blessed them for piety.  Instead, Satan has blessed them because they are rotten to the core.

The bizarre behavior of the archaeologists has much more complex origins.   Archaeologists nowadays tend to be far leftwing and at least atheists . . . in the Southeast more prone to be occult.   Why would they get in bed with folks having extremely opposite viewpoints to make fools out of themselves in the Maya Myth Busting in the Mountains Thang?  

Archaeologists are almost totally dependent on the federal dole, plus federal/state laws requiring their involvement in large, government-funded construction projects.  The private sector archaeology firms receive very little income from philanthropists these days.  The self-appointed ringleaders twisted the Maya Thang into a political issue in order to suck up to hogs at the trough.  However, even deeper is their fear that the public will find out that they are not omniscient and in fact, over the past few decades have created a fossilized stack of cards. 

Well, as Sheriff Andy Taylor (Griffith) would say,  “We got a mess here folks.”

 

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Richard Thornton is a professional architect, city planner, author and museum exhibit designer-builder. He is today considered one of the nation’s leading experts on the Southeastern Indians. However, that was not always the case. While at Georgia Tech Richard was the first winner of the Barrett Fellowship, which enabled him to study Mesoamerican architecture and culture in Mexico under the auspices of the Institutio Nacional de Antropoligia e Historia. Dr. Roman Piňa-Chan, the famous archaeologist and director of the Museo Nacional de Antropologia, was his fellowship coordinator. For decades afterward, he lectured at universities and professional societies around the Southeast on Mesoamerican architecture, while knowing very little about his own Creek heritage. Then he was hired to carry out projects for the Muscogee-Creek Nation in Oklahoma. The rest is history. Richard is the Tribal Historic Preservation Officer for the KVWETV (Coweta) Creek Tribe and a member of the Perdido Bay Creek Tribe. In 2009 he was the architect for Oklahoma’s Trail of Tears Memorial at Council Oak Park in Tulsa. He is the president of the Apalache Foundation, which is sponsoring research into the advanced indigenous societies of the Lower Southeast.

14 Comments

  1. 5card678919j@gmail.com'

    What was the attraction of N. America ? Considering that man has been traveling ever since he discovered that a log would float when thrown into water, it has to be the tales and stories and possible recommendations told by each cultures explorers who also traveled here before in each generation..

    Reply
    • What Georgia offered the Maya traders were very valuable minerals that either were rare or didn’t exist in the Maya lands. These included attapulgite, mica and a type of greenstone that made superior axes and wedges. There was also the rich gold and copper deposits in the Georgia Mountains.

      Reply
  2. markveale@hotmail.com'

    Richard, It saddens me how you have been treated by a few money corrupted people in North Western Carolina and the Federal lands of North Georgia. Why the private media blacked out your Maya discovery in Georgia does not surprise me anymore as there still are people in this country that don’t want to talk about the true history of this land. Native America peoples of the South were called the 5 civilized tribes but were still ill treated by the state of Georgia and the Federal Government….because of money. The root of all evil is money.

    Reply
    • Amen . . . plus the obsession with controlling others.

      Reply
    • adamfreeman1861@gmail.com'

      It is the “lust for money”, not money itself that is evil.

      Reply
      • Jesus said differently . . . It is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a camel than a rich man to enter the Kingdom of Heaven.

        Reply
  3. ToMjones@yahoo.com'

    Richard, do you have a resume with the date and title of your lectures at the various universities?

    Reply
    • Heavens no! You are talking about a long period of time. I can’t begin to remember all the places I have spoken at. Anything I said before 2017 would be highly obsolete today, anyway.

      Let’s see . . . in Georgia the first time, Georgia Tech, Georgia State, West Georgia, Auburn, University of Georgia and the Atlanta Archaeological Society. During the 10 years I lived in Asheville – UNC-A and Western Carolina, plus dozens of talks to various historical societies and community groups around the region. While living in the Shenandoah Valley – James Madison, Shenandoah College and Conservatory, Virginia Tech, American University, Catholic University, University of Maryland and zillions of archaeological and historical societies, plus community groups. Even though I lived only about an hour’s drive from the University of Virginia, I was never invited to speak there.

      Since returning to Georgia, I have only been invited to speak to historical societies. Here is the irony. The moment that I was hired by the Creek Nation to do paid research in 2005, a clique of Georgia archaeologists began waging war on me. That was when I really began to learn about my Creek heritage. I was no threat as long as I only talked about Mesoamerica. LOL

      PS – Just remembered that I also spoke to some student archaeology or Colonial history societies at some smaller colleges/universities in Fairfax County, VA and the Maryland suburbs of Washington and Baltimore, but I can’t remember their names. You are talking about events 25-30 years ago! During that period, they were primarily interested in my work restoring Colonial and Early Federal farms and buildings.

      Reply
      • JerryJones@yahoo.com'

        Most Universities keep a log of invited speakers…I’ll have a look! Thanks, Jad

        Reply
        • Well, I moved away from Georgia in 1976. You can ask my cousin Randy. He was a student at West Georgia the two times I spoke there. I stayed in his trailer. LOL

          Reply
  4. Queenladyj7@gmail.com'

    Mr Richard Thornton, I So Appreciate Your Valuable Educational Research Work, I’d like to Know which Tribe are your heritage? I’m of Blackfoot and Cherokee Tribe According to Elder Aunts Elder Cousins, And Mother.Have NO Knowledge of My Father’s, Since I didn’t get to have a Relationship with him, But he’s from Arkansas, Mom born and Raised in Bflo.NY, So Again it’s Very Interesting Learning True Deeper Scientic Evidence of Facts. Are You of African/Indian descent (Of Deeper Melanin)???

    Reply
    • My Native heritage is from several branches of the Creeks . . . Georgia Apalache, Uchee, Itsate, Sawate and Ilape. According to family tradition, I had direct ancestors at Palachicola, when the founder of the Methodist Church, the Rev. John Wesley, preached there.

      Reply
  5. duannkier@windstream.net'

    Thank you so much for sharing this radio interview with us! I couldn’t help but chuckle about how many times you patiently shared with the the interviewer that the Mayans who came to Georgia built the mounds of the common people rather than the temples of the elite. I know I might be getting too woo-woo for some people, but are you aware that there are some who think the Lemurians migrated to Peru and might be the source for the original “giants” and also of the elongated skulls?

    Reply
    • You got it right! Actually, the Itza and Kekchi Mayas did not build any stone pyramids during the Classic Period. Those, who moved to Chichen Itza did eventually learn from the locals and built some large monuments there.

      Reply

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