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Strange geo-glyph discovered near Cheoah River in Graham County, NC

Strange geo-glyph discovered near Cheoah River in Graham County, NC

 

ERSI satellite imagery of Graham County, NC in the extreme western end of that state, has picked up a inexplicable footprint on the soil.   It is located in the flood plain of Yellow Creek near its confluence with the Cheoah River.   This geo-glyph is of the scale of those on the Nazca Plain in Peru.  It appears to be either the footprint of a triangular European fort or an upside-down bat with the head no longer visible . . . but maybe not. This location was in the Province of Chiaha, where Juan Pardo built a fort.  Note the separate rectangular footprint to the north of the wings, plus what appears to be radiating lines pointing to the southeast and southwest.  Do you have any ideas about this strange structure, creature or symbol on the landscape, immediately south of the Great Smoky Mountains?

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Richard Thornton is a professional architect, city planner, author and museum exhibit designer-builder. He is today considered one of the nation’s leading experts on the Southeastern Indians. However, that was not always the case. While at Georgia Tech Richard was the first winner of the Barrett Fellowship, which enabled him to study Mesoamerican architecture and culture in Mexico under the auspices of the Institutio Nacional de Antropoligia e Historia. Dr. Roman Piňa-Chan, the famous archaeologist and director of the Museo Nacional de Antropologia, was his fellowship coordinator. For decades afterward, he lectured at universities and professional societies around the Southeast on Mesoamerican architecture, while knowing very little about his own Creek heritage. Then he was hired to carry out projects for the Muscogee-Creek Nation in Oklahoma. The rest is history. Richard is the Tribal Historic Preservation Officer for the KVWETV (Coweta) Creek Tribe and a member of the Perdido Bay Creek Tribe. In 2009 he was the architect for Oklahoma’s Trail of Tears Memorial at Council Oak Park in Tulsa. He is the president of the Apalache Foundation, which is sponsoring research into the advanced indigenous societies of the Lower Southeast.

11 Comments

  1. dgnsandrak@inbox.com'

    My personal take on this one is that the image has developed over recent years as a result of plowing. Since it is easier to turn a team approximately 90 degrees than it is to do a full 180 at the end of each row, start at the circumferential fence line and just keep going, gradually filling the field toward the center. The diagonal rays show the turn points. The upper field, not quite wide enough for this pattern, shows a compromise, only needing one 180 on the south after every two angle turns.

    Reply
    • Could be, but the fields there are chock full of Mississippian Period artifacts and there are several mounds nearby – one of the huge.

      Reply
      • PETEJONES@YAHOO.Com'

        What dan said, classic turn plow method

        Reply
    • csmoke@webound.com'

      what about selective fertilizing? in the farm area I used to deer hunt, the farmers spot tested the soil and then only fertilized where the tests called for refreshing. maybe there is weak soil fertility in parts of the fields from non upkeep.

      Reply
      • Could be . . . but as replied to an earlier comment . . . this area is chock full of artifacts and a huge mound.

        Reply
      • moonbranchinfo@gmail.com'

        There’s really no “farming” in the valley to speak of….. just pasture, bushogged fields and some vegetable plots for household use.

        Reply
  2. ah.all@inorbit.com'

    Sure looks like an enormous 5 sided pyramid with adjacent mound, from here, Richard. Once again, another major earthworks on that -83rd latitude. From here, to, among others, Ocmulgee at -83.5917, to Guayabo, at -83.6907, to Los Diquis at -83.4647, significant sites line up, north/south, along that particular latitude.

    Reply
    • That is amazing Andrew, isn’t it? I wonder how the did it? Longitude was extremely difficult to calculate before the days of GPS satellites. That was the hardest part of the course in navigation that I had to take in Naval Science (NROTC).

      Reply
      • ah.all@inorbit.com'

        …Longitude, excuse me, Richard, but, yes, it astonishes me, too. Now I wonder if these sites may line up more accurately with true north than with our contemporary magnetic north.

        Reply
  3. P.glover@comcast.net'

    Richard, has anyone cross referenced any of the Creek words with Aymara words. I know that “palla” in Aymara translates to “woman or mother”.
    Is it possible Appalachia may have meant mother-land? Just a thought!

    Reply
    • Yes, I have. The three South American languages that repeatedly show up in Southeast are Panoan (Shipibo, Conibo, Kashibo, etc.). Southern Arawak and Middle Arawak. Middle Arawak is confined to Florida. The Panoans and Muskogeans rolled their R’s so much that the sounded like L’s to English speakers. So when a Panoan says the name of their country, Peru, it sounds like Palu. I noticed that when a French Huguenot in South Carolina drew a map of South Carolina, he correctly wrote Palachicola and Parachicora.

      Reply

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