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Teotihuacan had same origin myth as Muskogeans

Teotihuacan had same origin myth as Muskogeans

The origin myths of the Alabamas, Choctaws, Chickasaws and Creeks begin with fully formed humans walking out of a “sacred cave in the west ” into the sunlight.  It will come as a surprise to many North Americans that the founders of Teotihuacan had exactly the same origin myth.  A thousand years later, the Aztecs called this legendary cave, Chicomoztoc.

There is another shared cultural tradition.  The people of Teotihuacan, the Apalache of North Georgia and the ancestors of the Creek Indians worshiped an invisible, FEMALE sun goddess.

Archaeologists in Mexico’s INAH have recently discovered the entrance to a shaft that leads down to a natural cave, directly under the center of the Pyramid of the Sun.  Artifacts found with a temple constructed in the cave indicated that this was the actual cave that was the equivalent of the Judeo-Christian  Garden of Eden.  Of course, the Mexican archaeologists seem to be equally unaware that the Muskogean tribes of the Southeast had the same origin legend.   It is powerful evidence that the Muskogeans originated in Eastern Mexico . . . or perhaps a cave in western Mexico!  <wink>

This one of the many fascinating bits of cultural trivia that you will learn in the next edition of The Mayas Then and Now.  Article Six is a time line that compares events in southern Mexico to those in the Southeastern United States.  The chronology of Chichen Itza is almost identical to that of the ancestors of the Creeks in Georgia.

 

 

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Richard Thornton is a professional architect, city planner, author and museum exhibit designer-builder. He is today considered one of the nation’s leading experts on the Southeastern Indians. However, that was not always the case. While at Georgia Tech Richard was the first winner of the Barrett Fellowship, which enabled him to study Mesoamerican architecture and culture in Mexico under the auspices of the Institutio Nacional de Antropoligia e Historia. Dr. Roman Piňa-Chan, the famous archaeologist and director of the Museo Nacional de Antropologia, was his fellowship coordinator. For decades afterward, he lectured at universities and professional societies around the Southeast on Mesoamerican architecture, while knowing very little about his own Creek heritage. Then he was hired to carry out projects for the Muscogee-Creek Nation in Oklahoma. The rest is history.Richard is the Tribal Historic Preservation Officer for the KVWETV (Coweta) Creek Tribe and a member of the Perdido Bay Creek Tribe. In 2009 he was the architect for Oklahoma’s Trail of Tears Memorial at Council Oak Park in Tulsa. He is the president of the Apalache Foundation, which is sponsoring research into the advanced indigenous societies of the Lower Southeast.

7 Comments

  1. dgreen1238@gmail.com'

    Richard,
    I always print out your e-mails to keep for future reference but the last two you sent out would only
    print out the headings. Can you correct this?
    I really enjoy your articles. It’s a pity that the leaders of this country will not bring out the true history
    of this nation so that it can be taught in our schools. I’m 73 years old and most of my life I have searched for the true
    name of my ancestor who fought so valiantly at horseshoe bend, and I will probably die without ever being able to speak
    his red stick name. Your e-mails are a blessing for me, keep them coming. Thanks, Don

    Reply
    • Hey Donald

      I am not the webmaster of the site, just the primary writer and editor. You can cut and paste the articles with your mouse. I just tried and it worked. However, I will pass your complaint on to the folks, who actually maintain the site. Thank you!

      Reply
  2. markveale@hotmail.com'

    Richard, The Maya also had connections with caves in their beliefs. At 9,400 BC the ancient city of note was destroyed called “Atlantis” by the Greeks. They got the story from a city called “Sais” in Egypt. “YS”, “IS” was a city noted by the people that renamed a roman city” Paris”. An impact at 9400 BC has all but been stated and would have caused all these statement from the ancient Elders of caves connected many Native peoples. The debris of the tidal wave was located in the 1800’s by the Yukon Gold miners. All but a few were wiped out in North America.
    Also, I have noticed there are many connections of the design of King Solomon’s (Hiram) temple (3 sections, Sacred fire, flat top to the Earth mounds of the South East AND the temple of “Atlant-is”. “PO-NI-KI” is an ancient name for the Phoenicians…”KO-lO-MO-KI” (Solomon time connection?) might have some connections to the sea fairing people that left first (10,000 BC) from the Bible location of “Pi shon”.
    The many peoples of the ancient Kingdom of the A-pa-la-cha must have had connections with many different places of the world to include the Maya Itza, (Toltec-ah), Peru (Chiska), Europe (Duhare), Asia (China’s treasure ships visit of the 1300’s) and of course the “YHWH” word given 1330 BC in EGYPT to the HEBREWS. “Haggi” (Cha-g-gi) cap is a name of the second son of GAD. The Ala-ghey (Black sea area), Apalacha, Chiska, the Phoenicians, all wore the same style of hats.

    Reply
  3. iwg42@hotmail.com'

    Hey Richard,
    I just watched an episode of Expedition Unknown about Teotihuacan and the Pyramid of the Sun. They showed the tunnel that are being dug under it and the sacred room found in the middle of the structure. They also went to Chulula and filmed the work being done on the worlds largest pyramid under the Spanish Cathedral there. One thing that stood out to me was the obsidian mine located in the area. The finest obsidian was colored green was is found no where else in the world. In your article on Sautee you mentioned the archaeologist with you found obsidian laying around the ball court, but did not mention the color. Do you know the color they found and do you know if any test results are complete. It would be great if this were like the attapulgus sample from Palenque a 99%+ match to the samples.
    Thanks for all the brainfood!!!
    Wayne

    Reply
    • Wayne,
      About a month later, the archaeologist told me that after leaving my house, he drove back to the Nacoochee Valley and put the obsidian back where he found it. So no tests were done and I have no idea where that obsidian flake is. We picked it up at the edge of a gravel parking lot at the Sautee Nacoochee Community Center. I would have returned to the folks at the Center rather than losing it entirely. They could have had it tested. Oh well!

      Reply
  4. redearth@hemc.net'

    What was the basic government set up of the creek confederacy in the south? I assume t was patriarchial, with a king/god as the head of the government. do we know if there was a senate or any other body that assisted the ruler? The people who came here, the mayans, later the spanish jews were escaping barbarism or persecution, Do we know if upon starting over here they decided to set the new government up differently than the one they had left? Or did the elites run things here as they did in the home countries?

    Reply
    • The Creek government was a representative democracy with an elected head of state (Paracusi-ti) who was elected for life unless impeached for grossly inappropriate leadership. All adult men and women could vote. Women could serve in any elected office except those involving command of the military. There was a separate head of state for war time, since the Great Sun or Paracusi-ti was forbidden from shedding blood. Creek society was matriarchal. Women owned all domestic buildings and all farmland. Men collectively owned all public buildings and the hunting lands. There were two legislative bodies. The Upper House was an advisor council of elders, who had to endorse all actions of the Great Sun. The Lower House generally enacted all laws and specifically included women who represented each of the clans. Duality and sexual harmony were major themes of Creek society. Homosexuality is still extremely rare among the Creeks, but quite common, among non-Muskogean tribes.

      Reply

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