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The Sounds of Silence . . . Why Native Americans have not been mentioned in either political convention

The Sounds of Silence . . . Why Native Americans have not been mentioned in either political convention

Preface to a Guest Editorial by Jim Rhodes

You soon will be reading a guest editorial by Jim Rhodes, an Alabama Creek leader and Vietnam War Veteran, who has quietly done as much or more as anybody else to bring about friendly relations between the people of Vietnam and the United States.  Jim is deeply concerned about the escalating level of terrorism and religious persecution in the world.   The news seems to be getting worse every day.

A couple of weeks ago, Jim asked the POOF Editorial Board, if he could write a historical narrative on the experiences of Southeastern Native Americans in the past concerning terrorism and religious persecution . . . linked to contemporary events.  We enthusiastically agreed.   The Native American perspective on all current events is completely missing in the national media today . . . indeed, even in the national mindset.   It is obvious that the national media and now, the national political parties have followed the lead of the television industry in an intentional effort to erase the current existence of indigenous Americans.  They do not want the electorate to hear the Native American perspective on public policy and current events.

The situation is certainly not the same in Canada and Mexico, so this observation is squarely aimed at television and political moguls in the United States.   Think about it.  In the seven decades of nationally broadcast television in the United States, there has never been an entertainment series that portrayed a modern Native American family!  With the initial exception of Jay Silverheels, Tonto in The Lone Ranger,  the very few male Native Americans to be hired as lead characters, were married to Caucasian actresses and had very Caucasian looking children.  No Native American woman has ever played a Native American woman in a starring role on United States television series.*   On the few occasions when real Native Americans were placed temporarily in scripts, they were presented as essentially, taciturn, dim witted cartoon characters.   Had these roles been of African-American characters,  the NAACP would have had a conniption.

* Mixed-heritage actress, Angelina Jolie, played Georgia Hawkins, a 19th century mixed-blood Creek woman, in a made-for-TV movie, True Women. Canadian mixed-heritage actress,  Irene Bedard, has played several important roles in made-for-TV movies.

The buzz word today in merchandise marketing and political propaganda is “diversity.”   Madison Avenue wants to persuade as many people as possible to buy their product, whether it be a new brand of Smart Phone or a political candidate.   More and more, on television ads we are presented with a group of people with different hair colors and facial features.  You will see Scandinavians, Africans, Chinese, Japanese, Redheads, light skinned Latin Americans, a token Anglo-Saxon and frequently now, a light skinned female Arabic model wearing a burqa.  Very rarely, advertising directors will make a mistake and include a Latin American mestizo, who is more indigenous than Spanish . . . but NEVER a full blooded, indigenous Latin American.  Fox News is having a hissy fit now, because the new president of Bolivia is a full-blooded Native American. 

The “problem” is that most Native Americans are in varying degrees, spiritual people.   They often have a six sense that enables them to know things that cannot be immediately discerned physically. We can usually discern when a person has a “dark soul” or a “dead soul.”   Such things are not defined by science, psychology or codes of law.

Spirituality is not the same thing as religiosity.   Almost never do Native Americans try to force others to believe the same as they do.  Simultaneously,  as Jim Rhodes will point out,  most Native Americans deeply resent other people trying to control them or force their religion upon them.   That characteristic has caused many Native Americans to be deemed as being ill-suited for becoming thralls of the New World Order.   People, who can’t be controlled, are a threat to the Horned Serpent.

The essay by Jim Rhodes will point out that the leaders of both major political parties in the United States . . . as are most leaders of European countries . . . are trying to define mindless terrorism and religious persecution in secular, legal terms.  They define mass murders and killing of teenage girls because they wore blue jeans as being “against the law.”   North American and European governments continue to fail in their “war against terrorism,” because they view the solution as being bigger, meaner and more technologically sophisticated law enforcement.  The problem is that the perpetrators of mindless violence are following another set of laws . . . the laws of insanity.

Native Americans know that bloodthirsty mass killing of humans is not strictly a legal matter, but a manifestation of spiritual warfare. Evil trying to destroy good.  Terrorists and perpetrators of “honor killings” are not misguided followers of God, but rather biological robots being controlled by demons . . . aka Satan or the Horned Serpent. Yes, demonic possession is a long term observation of Muskogean monotheism. We know that certain drugs, excessive alcohol, social conditioning, demonic leaders, false religions, false prophets and personal manipulation via inundation in propaganda, can cause humans to voluntarily submit to an external, evil spiritual force, which takes control of their behavior.  There is no other way of explaining what happened to Germany in the 1930s.

This is why I am so critical of the conjuring activities going on at the North Carolina Cherokee Reservation. Unbelievable! These people are inviting demons to take possession of their lives.  The Cherokees have gone back to their old religion of conjuring demons in fires and springs to “tell them what to do.”   However in recent years, they have carried this evil superstition a step further and now are conjuring demons to attack each other and their enemies.   The only result of this madness will be just that . . . mass insanity on the reservation and complete disintegration of the tribe.

ETALWA-CROSSAnd yet . . . the very segment of the United States population which has the special, innate skills to fight spiritual warfare, has been relegated by government bureaucrats, Libertarians, Socialists, Republicans and Democrats alike to be non-existent.   The Master of Life (God) gives nations the leaders that they deserve.

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Richard Thornton is a professional architect, city planner, author and museum exhibit designer-builder. He is today considered one of the nation’s leading experts on the Southeastern Indians. However, that was not always the case. While at Georgia Tech Richard was the first winner of the Barrett Fellowship, which enabled him to study Mesoamerican architecture and culture in Mexico under the auspices of the Institutio Nacional de Antropoligia e Historia. Dr. Roman Piňa-Chan, the famous archaeologist and director of the Museo Nacional de Antropologia, was his fellowship coordinator. For decades afterward, he lectured at universities and professional societies around the Southeast on Mesoamerican architecture, while knowing very little about his own Creek heritage. Then he was hired to carry out projects for the Muscogee-Creek Nation in Oklahoma. The rest is history.Richard is the Tribal Historic Preservation Officer for the KVWETV (Coweta) Creek Tribe and a member of the Perdido Bay Creek Tribe. In 2009 he was the architect for Oklahoma’s Trail of Tears Memorial at Council Oak Park in Tulsa. He is the president of the Apalache Foundation, which is sponsoring research into the advanced indigenous societies of the Lower Southeast.

7 Comments

  1. playclay2013@yahoo.com'

    That’s some serious perception!
    Said by a mostly euro/nordic with a bit of Native American which pulls & speaks to me very strongly. And did speak to me before I even knew of the blood line.

    Reply
    • Actually, I am almost 75% Scandinavian DNA from Eastern Scotland and NE England. However, I am nevertheless, quite proud of my 27% Native American and Polynesian DNA too! No wonder I took to speaking Swedish so quickly when working over there. A Scottish engineer and I took to it like ducks to water, but engineers from other parts of Europe and the United States couldn’t pronounce the words.

      Reply
  2. ashlilin.al@gmail.com'

    May i ask, how might i find accurate information on native spirituality. Ive done a google search on the horned serpent, and of course the information given is a total different image than you describe here. I would like very much to know this history, especially more about the master of life (god). I was always told natives believed earth was god, worshiping trees and plants animals (false gods) much like pagans. i know better now, i even question what the pagans believed, as i understand the difference in worship and honoring. but there are so many websites with the same false stories or guessed interpretations. Seems like the truth is a needle in a haystack, i cant even find the haystack.

    Reply
    • I don’t Ashely. The people, who are truly spiritual don’t advertise it and certainly don’t charge money for disciples to learn from them. There must be 10,000 “Cherokee medicine men” running around the country, charging fees for distributing their wisdom.

      Guess the best answer I can give you comes from Yeshuah ben Yusif . . . commonly known as Jesus Christ. He said to judge a tree by the fruit it bears.

      Reply
  3. iwg42@hotmail.com'

    Wow Richard what a thought provoking post. I have found that religion comes from a book and spiritually comes from the heart AND the head. Thats why I find many people that wear their religion on their sleeve have a shallow belief. They talk about it to reinforce their belief that they are right and you are,wrong. What is the “truth” has caused much blood shed without answering the question, because I believe “truth” is diffrent to everyone. Let me live my life and believe as I see fit as long as it does not hurt or harm others. As a keeper of the Wind Clan I am sure you have seen many things and people that prove your point about the “Medicine” men. They sound like a lot of the TV preachers out there today. Working a scam.
    Thanks for the brainfood

    Reply
    • And thank you Wayne for being such a morale booster!

      Reply
  4. Gadawgluver56@aol.com'

    Amen Brother.

    Reply

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