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Time passes so quickly when you are having fun!

Time passes so quickly when you are having fun!

 

March 2012 . . .  You Are There!

The Maya-Myth-Busting-In-The-Mountains cartel kicked off its brilliant 2012 blitzkrieg campaign by sending one of the scions of the Georgia Council of Professional Archaeologists to demonstrate his intellectual superiority before the lowly thralls of the Georgia Trail of Tears Association.  He got right to the point by opening the speech with . . . “This Maya Thang is a bunch of crap!

Unfortunately, the blitzkrieg got off to a bad start because:

  • The Georgia Council of Professional Archaeologists did not realize that the Creeks had their own Trail of Tears . . . except no one paid them for their stolen land . . . and they just might be a substantial percentage of members in the National Trail of Tears Association.
  •  The Georgia Council of Professional Archaeologists did not realize that most Creek kids grow up being told that they are part Maya.
  • The Georgia Council of Professional Archaeologists did not realize that the Tamatly Band of Cherokees in North Carolina and the Towns County Indians in Georgia are ALSO part Maya.
  • The Georgia Council of Professional Archaeologists did not realize that Altamaha, Chattahoochee, Chiaha and Tamachichi were Itza Maya words.   That’s right . . . Chattahoochee means “Stone Stela – Small River” in Itza Maya!
  • The Georgia Council of Professional Archaeologists did not realize that Itsate (Hitchiti in Cracker English) meant “Itza People.”
  • The Georgia Council of Professional Archaeologists did not realize that almost all Native Americans have an IQ over 75 and are now allowed to attend public schools in all the Southeastern states.
  • In other words, the speech was NOT a good way to win friends and influence people.

In next week’s TV show, we will feature another member of the Georgia Council of Professional Archaeologists, who told the Atlanta Chamber of Commerce . . . “These people, who say the Mayas came to Georgia, are really Marxists, who want to take away all your money!”

 

“What sort of day was it? A day like all days, filled with those events that alter and illuminate our times… all things are as they were then, and you were there. Until next time . . . This is Walter Cronkite signing off.

 

 

 

 

 

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Richard Thornton is a professional architect, city planner, author and museum exhibit designer-builder. He is today considered one of the nation’s leading experts on the Southeastern Indians. However, that was not always the case. While at Georgia Tech Richard was the first winner of the Barrett Fellowship, which enabled him to study Mesoamerican architecture and culture in Mexico under the auspices of the Institutio Nacional de Antropoligia e Historia. Dr. Roman Piňa-Chan, the famous archaeologist and director of the Museo Nacional de Antropologia, was his fellowship coordinator. For decades afterward, he lectured at universities and professional societies around the Southeast on Mesoamerican architecture, while knowing very little about his own Creek heritage. Then he was hired to carry out projects for the Muscogee-Creek Nation in Oklahoma. The rest is history. Richard is the Tribal Historic Preservation Officer for the KVWETV (Coweta) Creek Tribe and a member of the Perdido Bay Creek Tribe. In 2009 he was the architect for Oklahoma’s Trail of Tears Memorial at Council Oak Park in Tulsa. He is the president of the Apalache Foundation, which is sponsoring research into the advanced indigenous societies of the Lower Southeast.

11 Comments

  1. Bellcamp221@yahoo.com'

    Way to Go Richard… Tell it as it is. Keep up the Great work and videos. We truth seekers are believers…

    Reply
    • Well, we’uns don’t want to forget recent history. It is being covered even more than the ancient history.

      Reply
  2. Iwg42@hotmail.com'

    Hey Richard
    It has been a while since you kicked that ant mound!!! I for one am very glad you did, look at how far POOF has come. Keep up the great work, I have really enjoyed the last several articles. Who would have thought a website like POOF, may have solved the mystery of where the Cherokee came from. (A shout out to Andrew for finding the map, thank you for sharing the info). And to all your readers keep commenting I enjoy the comments and info sharing. I have had many hours of fun research following all the links posted.
    Hope the next 5 years brings much education and enlightment to POOF
    Thanks

    Reply
    • Yes, don’t forget that Andrew found the map and that Marilyn Rae found the long, lost book that told us so much about the Creek’s ancestors in the 1600s! However, I did find the lost Creek Migration Legends . . . with the irreplaceable help of some guy named Charles Windsor. His friends call him the Prince. LOL

      Reply
      • Iwg42@hotmail.com'

        Hey Richard
        Absolutely I want to thank all the folks that have helped. I like the collaborative effort that has gone into POOF. I dont know of any other website that gets help from the Royal house of Windsor et al down to regular readers like me that run across a nugget of information every so often.
        Thanks and Keep kicking that ant mound!!

        Reply
  3. bjenalls@yahoo.com'

    Richard I love reading your posts, my family home is Senoia Georgia. We are no longer considered Native American because our grandparents hid to avoid the trail of tears. Some hid with the Blacks, others with the Whites. My family are the Middlebrooks and we too are still here. Chief Dode McIntosh told us we are decendents of the Maya, when he returned to visit our town, which is named after his mother Princess Senoia. Please keep telling our story until no one can deny us ever again!

    Reply
    • Hey Barbara

      I know Senoia well! I was on the planning team for Peachtree City. While living there, I designed its original path system and pedestrian bridges. If you can prove Creek ancestors, you are welcome to join the Coweta Creek Tribe. You don’t have to be on any official government rolls. My ancestors didn’t hide out. They lived on a Revolutionary War veteran’s reserve next to the Savannah River and couldn’t be forced to move.

      Reply
  4. dwix@mindspring.com'

    I moved, in February to a house that is adjacent to and once part of a farm that has been in my family since 1904. It has a large stone in the back yard. .actually large stones everywhere… This one has interesting markings that I first thought were probably plowing scars from all the years of work. I know think they are intentional markings. I have looked at the stone marking you have published and see similarity in some of the forms. If you would be interested I would like send pictures of the stone. If so, please email me and I will attach. I am in Paulding County Ga. just south of Dallas. Thank you and have been reading you posts for about a year now.
    Don

    Reply
    • Hey Don, that’s is a style of petroglyphs that I think was created by Arawaks. There were Arawaks in present day Douglas and Paulding Counties. There is a large petroglyphic boulder in the Nacoochee Valley that looks exactly what you described. Could you send photos of some of the rocks to PeopleOfOneFire@aol.com? I can tell you more after seeing them. Thanks! RT

      Reply
  5. jamesrhodes666@msn.com'

    We recently was part of a tour on the Yucatan (Mexico) and Mayan/Hispanic tour guides informed the group(s) in Spanish and English that the bright red and blue colors that covered many of the pyramids and buildings came from “Georgia and Alabama….” Apparently these poor folks are not only liars but don’t know their own history? Perhaps they need US ‘educational’ certification? lol Hey, maybe those guys are Marxist, it cost me to be on the tour (!) OR as the GOP (government oppressing people) would say, it was a “usage fee”-not to be confused with the word ‘tax.’ ….keep up the good work….

    Reply
    • Hey Jim

      People here don’t know this, but this subject was the subject of a hugely successful documentary for Latin American television viewers in 2014. In Mexican, the TV program was even shown at movie theaters. The producers actually paid me a decent salary for being on it. I am not fluent in Spanish so for long conversations I had to read a teleprompter, but they said that everyone understood me.

      Reply

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