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Wonderful news! Bill creating Ocmulgee National Historic Park has passed!

Wonderful news!   Bill creating Ocmulgee National Historic Park has passed!

 

Both the House of Representatives and the Senate have approved, with strong bipartisan support, the 2800 acre Ocmulgee National Historic Park.  The bill is now on the President’s desk for signing.  This has been a dream of the people of Macon . . . and the Creek People . . . for 86 years.  In the early 1930s the people of Macon contributed the money for purchasing about 2000 acres for this National Park, but the Federal government only took ownership of about 700 acres then labeled their land a national monument.  A national historic park is eligible for much larger grants to support archaeological and historical research, plus more rangers.  We are grateful for the hard work of the people of Macon in staying behind this bill for ten years, until it could become a reality.  The second phase of the new national park’s expansion will extend it southward for a total length of 38 miles. That change is expected to be several years in the future, because it will take awhile for the park staff to incorporate the additional acreage in the first bill.  

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Richard Thornton is a professional architect, city planner, author and museum exhibit designer-builder. He is today considered one of the nation’s leading experts on the Southeastern Indians. However, that was not always the case. While at Georgia Tech Richard was the first winner of the Barrett Fellowship, which enabled him to study Mesoamerican architecture and culture in Mexico under the auspices of the Institutio Nacional de Antropoligia e Historia. Dr. Roman Piňa-Chan, the famous archaeologist and director of the Museo Nacional de Antropologia, was his fellowship coordinator. For decades afterward, he lectured at universities and professional societies around the Southeast on Mesoamerican architecture, while knowing very little about his own Creek heritage. Then he was hired to carry out projects for the Muscogee-Creek Nation in Oklahoma. The rest is history. Richard is the Tribal Historic Preservation Officer for the KVWETV (Coweta) Creek Tribe and a member of the Perdido Bay Creek Tribe. In 2009 he was the architect for Oklahoma’s Trail of Tears Memorial at Council Oak Park in Tulsa. He is the president of the Apalache Foundation, which is sponsoring research into the advanced indigenous societies of the Lower Southeast.

7 Comments

  1. Geomatical@yahoo.com'

    Hooray! Yes, that is for sure wonderful news.

    Reply
    • johnwesleymobley@Comcast.net'

      Richard Thornton Sir, I noticed at Track rock on the opposite side of the road bull dozers have cleared the land. I thought this was the site of the burials. Do you know what they are doing here? Which side of the road is the Indian village on. I panicked when I saw that. I am planning a major photographic hike up there. May God bless. Blessings

      Reply
  2. evguidry3@yahoo.com'

    Hi, Richard,
    Is it also finally possible for this to be the place for that world-class southeast Native American museum and educational center. Or, at least one nearby, maybe on private but Native American owned adjoining land so as not to be under rigid government control (NAGPRA) as to allowable content. Would that be practical or sensible.
    I know you have waited long for that as well. And, I’ll bet many folks will generously contribute items, time, and finances to that effort if they saw it really begin to come to pass…me among them. And, your talents and experiences as a leader and designer in that regard will be invaluable.
    All the best,
    Ed Guidry

    Reply
    • I strongly believe that the people of Macon would be highly supportive of such a museum. They are still upset that the State of Georgia built the Georgia Music Hall of Fame and several state office buildings on land that was supposed to be part of Ocmulgee National Monument then closed the Music Hall of Fame over the protests of local residents.

      Reply
      • johnwesleymobley@comcast.net'

        Richard Thornton Sir, I noticed at Track rock on the opposite side of the road bull dozers have cleared the land. I thought this was the site of the burials. Do you know what they are doing here? Which side of the road is the Indian village on. I panicked when I saw that. I am planning a major photographic hike up there. May God bless. Blessings

        Reply
        • The Track Rock Terrace complex in on the east side of the road. The petroglyphs and burials on the west side of the road. It may be that the US Forest Service is creating a larger parking lot. The US Forest Service had never communicated directly to me, only slandered me professionally on their website. Also, I have no contacts with anybody in Union County, so really don’t know what is happening there. Keep us informed.

          Reply
  3. markveale@hotmail.com'

    Richard, I strongly agree the President should sign the a bill to make it a Native American operated Park. The Native Americans of that area should know they are related to multiple peoples that arrived to Georgia and the South. The Creeks, Yuchi/Tokah, Cherokee (mostly all mixed) should move forward into the future. As you know more than 99.9 % of people in that area about Georgia Native ancient history…perhaps a retainer should be offered to you by the National park service. The Earth mounds building began much earlier around the Northern Gulf of Mexico and maybe the Okefenokee swamp lake peoples…not anything in Mexico/ central America till around 1200-1500 BC and then on “both sides” of Central America? Do you know if the 1500 BC Olmecs ( Zokee/Sokee) that later moved to N.E Georgia aligned their towns with Pleiades? Thanks for the articles.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Itza#/media/File:Carte_Empire_Itza_1519.tif

    Reply

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